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“There are so many great organizations out there waiting to help people who have lost their vision. I’m glad MindsEye makes a point of connecting listeners to them.” - Rita, retired accessibility instructor

Safari Tours - Described!

 

Join MindsEye for a day at the zoo! Located on 90 acres in beautiful Forest Park, the Saint Louis Zoo is home to more than 588 species of animals, many of them rare and endangered. Since its inception in 1910, the Zoo has been renowned for its beautiful naturalistic exhibits and for its diverse collection of animals from the major continents and biomes of the world. It is widely recognized for its innovative approaches to animal management, wildlife conservation, research and education.

 

The Saint Louis Zoo is excited to welcome the blind and visually-impaired community to experience three different walking tours on Saturday, November 4th for FREE! And as always, The Zoo is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and there is no cost for admission.

 

The Great American Solar Eclipse has come and gone, but the memories of this amazing phenomenon will be held in the hearts of everyone who experienced it. MindsEye joined forces with Missouri Council of the Blind (MCB) on Monday, August 21st to celebrate the solar eclipse at their offices in Saint Louis during their “Watch and Listen Party.” MCB threw a fantastic event with over twenty people attending this fellowship of the sun and moon; guests shared their excitement and chowed down on a lunch of fried chicken with sides of potato salad and hot rolls.

 

A group of about twenty people stare up towards the sky as they stand on a black asphalt parking between two brick buildings. Many of the people wear audio description listening devices and eclipse glasses.

A group of about twenty people stare up towards the sky as they stand on a black asphalt parking between two brick buildings. Many of the people wear audio description listening devices and eclipse glasses.

 

ART IS FOR EVERYONE.

MindsEye launched our 2017 Audio Description Campaign "Art Is For Everyone" on Friday, August 4th through the Arts and Education Council's crowdfunding platform.

Will you help us reach our goal?

It's imperative that we work together so that ANYONE with a visual-impairment can still "See a Play!"

 

DONATE TODAY.

A young girl sits in a red seat in a theatre auditorium listening to the audio description of a show.

A black orb covers a light orb. Rays of light and bubbly bits of color erupt behind it.

 

MindsEye’s Vision: Art (and the Great American Eclipse) Is for Everyone

Saint Louis, MO – August 17, 2017 -  Everyone is talking about the Great American Eclipse and where they’re going to go to see it, but how does someone who is visually-impaired or blind experience this once in a lifetime event? Audio description allows people who are visually impaired to take full advantage of theater productions, art shows, museum exhibits, and all of life’s moments. It’s a similar idea to sign language interpreter services for the deaf.

MindsEye will go LIVE Monday, August 21st from 1PM – 2PM on Facebook and ON AIR to broadcast the Audio Description of the much-anticipated Solar Eclipse during The Missouri Council of the Blind's "Watch and Listen Party." The description will focus on the science of the eclipse and (of course!) the visual elements as the eclipse passes over the city and we experience 56 seconds of totality. 

MindsEye’s 11th Annual Beepball Tournament was a hit!

 

Lighthouse for the Blind team member Anthony Easley, of east St. Louis, attempts to bat a beeping ball by listening to its approach at the 11th Annual Ultimate Beepball Tournament at Assumption Parish in south St. Louis County.

 

Saturday, July 15th, 2017 was a spectacular day at Assumption Parish in South St. Louis – local organizations and friends of MindsEye joined together to support a day of fun, athletics, and community in a game that gives visually impaired St. Louisans a chance to play ball. Beepball’s spin on baseball allows those who are blind to compete – and compete they did! Lighthouse for the Blind team member Anthony Easley, who has been blind since 1988, was able to experience playing on the field again and said, “…it’s a good feeling, I love it. Because I’m back on the diamond, something I thought I wouldn’t be able to do.”